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[-] [email protected] 6 points 3 days ago

Also, does the point of creating a game have to be making the "most" money? Isn't it enough to make something awesome and a profit?

[-] [email protected] 6 points 5 days ago

The people who make up the 2% market share using Firefox overlaps with the people tired of AI - specifically LLMs - being shoved into everything.

Mozilla just released a LLM-driven website generator a few months ago. Why are we assuming they won't add something similar to Firefox?

If Mozilla wants to use machine learning, awesome. But how about we treat the techies who support them like adults and say "machine learning" instead of using the AI buzzword which is overloaded.

[-] [email protected] 35 points 1 week ago

Yeah it's a scam. They'll claim they lost all the money that went into making the movie because no one would buy it for the price they wanted. If they'd sold it for the highest offer, they'd have lost less.

How is that any different than burning down my own building and claiming it as a loss in my taxes?

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My current team runs weekly retrospectives using the Lean Coffee format. More and more, I find that the items people are bringing up aren't really important or could just be a question in Slack.

For example, someone recently made a topic for how we can test credit card payments. Another topic was navel gazing about how we use Jira and multiple team members asked "what's the problem you're hoping to solve?" to which the only answer was "That's not what I've seen elsewhere".

I'm beginning to think that there's something wrong with our format or prompts, in that we aren't identifying important issues for discussion. Perhaps the format is stale or there's no serious issues lingering each week?

Any advice on alternative formats, how to get better feedback, etc. would be greatly appreciated.

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[-] [email protected] 69 points 2 weeks ago

The fact that Google started as a search company and yet search in their own apps sucks is boggling.

In YouTube Music, when you're building a tuner to create a station, you can't search at all. Instead, you get an endless scroll off bands and have to find the one you want that way. The order is random.

Like .. Pandora let you do the same thing with search back in the 00's

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[-] [email protected] 54 points 1 month ago

Reuters has temporarily removed the article “How an Indian startup hacked the world” to comply with a preliminary court order issued on Dec. 4, 2023, in a district court in New Delhi, India.

Reuters stands by its reporting and plans to appeal the decision.

The article, published Nov. 16, 2023, was based on interviews with hundreds of people, thousands of documents, and research from several cybersecurity firms.

The order was issued amid a pending lawsuit brought against Reuters in November 2022. As set forth in its court filings, Reuters disputes those claims.

[-] [email protected] 41 points 2 months ago

It's also disingenuous because they already decline to host sex workers newsletters. So if the censorship angle was true, they're already censoring.

[-] [email protected] 334 points 2 months ago

These people don't even read their own literature. The Catholic church's ban on alchemy is about falsely claiming something is a valuable metal in order to pay for debts. It has nothing to do with the occult -- the ban was because it's a sin to lie / cheat / steal. A saint is even on record saying that alchemical gold is ok if the end if product is real gold.

With that context, of course God doesn't give a shit if you use SQLAlchemy as long as you aren't using it to defraud people. If you were defrauding people, it wouldn't matter what tool you used.

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[-] [email protected] 46 points 3 months ago

It shouldn't be OK and Media Matters will surely file for a change of venue. They're located in DC and Twitter in California. Heck, Twitters own TOS says that your use of the service is governed by California law, so any claim that they fraudulently used the service should be handled in California.

But activist judges are also known to deny motions for made up reasons, so Twitter starts in Texas in hopes an activist judge keeps the case there to "stick it to the liberals."

[-] [email protected] 32 points 5 months ago

it means you can’t block ads without violating the DMCA. Browsers can have adblocker extensions, apps cannot (unless you hack them.)

I imagine this is just going to lead to more people using DNS ad blockers. My phone literally can't access your ad server, sorry.

[-] [email protected] 36 points 5 months ago

A recent pilot in Prague enabled Hosts on Airbnb to trial Minut noise sensors, and found a reminder can be all that’s needed for a potential noise issue to be quickly resolved

If a reminder is all that's needed, the device could be an offline decibel meter that lights up when the volume exceeds a threshold.

Plus I'm sure parents are going to love their phone blowing up when little Billy is a bit too cranky at bed time.

[-] [email protected] 30 points 6 months ago

Yeah, it's just like when Prince changed his name. The media will just keep going "X, formerly known as Twitter" forever.

[-] [email protected] 38 points 6 months ago

I worked at a firm that was regulated and audited by the SEC. The standard lesson from the compliance department was always to have potentially problematic conversations out loud instead of in email or Slack. They never needed encryption to avoid regulators.

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flumph

joined 6 months ago